Deputy Inspector- General of Police Tan Sri Noor Rashid Ibrahim says the police are now engaging with liaison officers in each school to better understand the situation on the ground in schools nationwide. File pic.

KUALA LUMPUR: The police are working with schools and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to curb gangsterism among school students.

Deputy Inspector- General of Police Tan Sri Noor Rashid Ibrahim said the police were now engaging with liaison officers in each school to better understand the situation on the ground in schools nationwide.

"Right now our target is to hold discussions with parent-teacher associations in schools.

"Such cases in schools should not go unreported as the police would like to work hand-in-hand with the parents, teachers and NGOs to curb the activity."

Noor Rashid was speaking to reporters after launching the Say No To Bullying at the police Training Centre here today.

He said statistics in 2015 revealed that out 10,000 juvenile cases reported, 8,000 had been called for investigation and 25 per cent of the people questioned were females.

"I am not saying the number is worrying but we have to give attention to the figures.

"We cannot let this gangsterism culture go out of control. We need to put a stop to it. Do not take this lightly."

Earlier, Noor Rashid gave a speech to some 1000 students representing over 100 schools who took part in the anti-bully initiative between the police and National Public Complaints and Welfare Service Centre.

With the launch of the programme, a task force dubbed the Anti-Bully Task Force was also set up, comprising the organisation members, police and Education Ministry staff.

The task force would identify students who were involved in negative activities, and would be responsible for guiding the teenagers and shape them into becoming better and more disciplined individuals.

National Public Complaints and Welfare Service Centre chairman Datuk A. Chandrakumanan said on Thursday the campaign focuses on Indian students aged from 11 to 16.

"The aim is to ensure that teenagers are not involved in negative areas such as bullying, anti-social activities and gangsterism.

"The centre, along with the police and Education Ministry, aims to reduce the children's involvement in such activities with the launch of the programme," he said.

Chandrakumanan said the programme would focus on Indian students during the initial stage of its implementation but the centre would also accept complaints from other races.

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